The Levys of Monticello

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The Levys of Monticello

“When I tell people that a Jewish family once owned Thomas Jefferson’s home at Monticello, their jaws drop,” says director Steven Pressman (50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. And Mrs. Kraus, JFF 2014). But the fact is that when Thomas Jefferson died, he left behind a mountain of personal debt, which forced his heirs to sell his beloved Monticello home and everything in it. Uriah Levy paid $2,700 to become its owner. The Levys of Monticello tells the little-known story of the Levy family, which owned and carefully preserved Monticello for 89 years, far longer than Jefferson or his descendants. This remarkable slice of the American story intersects with the rise of antisemitism that runs through the country’s history.

FREE screening for JBFC members on October 17

Tickets: $15 (members), $20 (nonmembers)

PAST EVENTS

10/17 6:00: Introduction and Q&A with Nancy (Bookman) Hoffman, one of the last survivors of the Levys of Monticello
Monday, Oct. 17 2022, 6:00
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91-year-old mother, Nancy (Bookman) Hoffman, is the daughter of Alma (Levy) Bookman, who was among the Levy sisters to regularly summer at “Uncle Jeff’s” place – which, of course, was/is Monticello.

10/10 6:00: Q&A filmmaker Steven Pressman
Monday, Oct. 10 2022, 6:00
This event is over. View all of our upcoming events.

“When I tell people that a Jewish family once owned Thomas Jefferson’s home at Monticello, their jaws drop,” says director Steven Pressman (50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. And Mrs. Kraus, JFF 2014). But the fact is that when Thomas Jefferson died, he left behind a mountain of personal debt, which forced his heirs to sell his beloved Monticello home and everything in it. Uriah Levy paid $2,700 to become its owner. The Levys of Monticello tells the little-known story of the Levy family, which owned and carefully preserved Monticello for 89 years, far longer than Jefferson or his descendants. This remarkable slice of the American story intersects with the rise of antisemitism that runs through the country’s history.

This film is part of the Jewish Film Festival 2022 series.



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